Frontline Therapy

Organizations


Canadian College of Osteopathy

Traditional Osteopathy, as presented by the Canadian College of Osteopathy, is defined as:

“A natural medicine which aims to restore function in the body by treating the causes of pain and imbalance. To achieve this goal the Osteopathic Manual Practitioner relies on the quality and finesse of his/her palpation and works with the position, mobility and quality of the tissues.”

Natural Medicine is a term used to convey the idea that with an osteopathic treatment, nothing is added (medications or remedies) or subtracted (surgery) from the body. Instead, the osteopathic philosophy embraces the notion that the body is naturally able to heal itself. The practitioner of Traditional Osteopathy works with the body to enhance this natural ability to self-regulate and self-heal.

Palpation (sometimes referred to as listening) is a diagnostic skill that the Osteopathic Manual Practitioner uses to feel or sensethe state of the tissues or systems being examined. This sense encompasses the many sensory aspects of touch, such as the ability to detect moisture, texture, temperature differential, and subtle motion. This ability to detect almost imperceptible motion, provides the Osteopathic Manual Practitioner with the capability of perceiving the inherent motion present in all living organisms. This palpatory ability is not a gift—rather it is a trained skill that takes years to develop.

Osteopathic Manual Practitioners palpate by a gently yet intentionally touching the tissues or systems under examination. With experience Osteopathic Manual Practitioners learn to palpate not just superficially but also very deeply within the body. This sensory information is received through touch receptors on the fingertips and palms, and through the proprioceptors (motion and position sensors) embedded deep in the joints of the hands, wrists, arms, and even in the shoulders.

The ability to detect minute modifications in the quality of the tissues is the assessment skill that allows the Osteopathic Manual Practitioners to help prioritize a patient's course of treatment. These tissue qualities include, congestion, dehydration, scarring, stiffness, density or loss of resilience, as well as motility that is an infinitesimal movement inherent to all living tissues. It is this sensing of the quality of the tissue, in combination with the positionmobility and vitality of the tissues, that allows the Osteopathic Manual Practitioners to determine the tissues or systems that need immediate attention.

ATHLETIC THERAPY
The Canadian Athletic Therapist Association (CATA) is an organization devoted to the health care of the physically active individual. A Certified Athletic Therapist must have fulfilled the academic and practical requirements as outlined in the document entitled "Procedures for Certification". Certified members have successfully completed a comprehensive theory exam and a subsequent oral/practical exam developed and administered by the certification board of the CATA.

The Scope of Practice of a Certified Athletic Therapist includes the assessment, prevention, immediate care, and reconditioning of musculoskeletal injuries. Prevention includes musculoskeletal and postural evaluation, equipment selection, fitting and repair, warm-up, conditioning programs, prophylactic or supportive taping, and adapting to the activity environment and facilities.

The provision of on-field immediate care of athletic injuries by a Certified Athletic Therapist includes: injury assessment, basic emergency life support, recognition and management of acute traumatic neurological dysfunction, provision of first aid, preparation for entrance into appropriate health care delivery systems, or, where appropriate, utilization of techniques facilitating a safe return to participation.

A Certified Athletic Therapist assesses injuries and conditions, utilizes contemporary rehabilitative techniques, therapeutic modalities, soft tissue mobilization, physical reconditioning, and supportive strapping procedures to promote an environment conducive to optimal healing in preparing the individual for safe reintegration into an active lifestyle.

The Athletic Therapist, in co-operation with all performance enhancement personnel, and members of the health care delivery team, is an integral part of a total service to maximize the performance and welfare of the individual. Concomitant with the execution of this role, the Athletic Therapist nurtures an attitude of positive health. 

Osteopathic International Alliances 
http://www.oialliance.org


Canadian Federation of Osteopaths
http://www.osteopathy.ca/index.html

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